Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

“Water saving features such as storage tanks, water efficiency devices, and boreholes in particular are unsurprisingly proving to be major selling features in Cape Town South, as property buyers are looking at the water problem as a long-term issue”, says Andre de Villiers, veteran Southern Suburbs real estate agent and owner of the Cape Town South group of four Chas Everitt offices.

“We are accordingly highlighting properties that we are marketing that feature such benefits as they definitely an attraction and we are of the opinion that for those interested in selling their property any such measures are well worth the additional investment to enhance the appeal and increase the competitive appeal and to protect one’s property value. We had a similar situation with load shedding and power saving devices not that long ago but with water-related issues there seems to be a greater value attached as it is not being seen as a temporary problem.”

“Pools are being seen as far less of an advantage and more of a hassle to be dealt with and water-wise gardens are also attracting a lot of positive discussions,” said de Villiers.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Alvin Dyers Quartet – Casa Labia Summer Jazz Concert Series

Alvin Dyers Quartet – Casa Labia Summer Jazz Concert Series

Alvin Dyers’ quartet features Zeke Le Grange, one of the most exciting young saxophonists in South Africa, with Tino Europa on bass and Roy Davids on drum kit. This quartet has played together for many years, performing classic jazz standards, South African jazz and original compositions with a uniquely Capetonian sound, that blends elements of Latin music, Cape Goema, African music and straight-ahead jazz.

Alvin Dyers was born in Harfield Village in Cape Town in 1953. He started playing guitar from the age of seven. He formed his first band called Sacred Legion with his equally talented brother, Errol Dyers. He also formed part of the group musicians that played in Pacific Express in the ‘80s. Some of the musicians he has played with include other legends, for example Winston Mankunku, Ezra Ngcukana, Johnny Fourie, Robbie Jansen and many more. He is currently a jazz guitar teacher at the University of Cape Town where he continues to nurture and inspire another generation of jazz musicians in the province.

R150 per person – payable in advance
A cash bar will be available
(Free seating)

For all Cultural bookings please contact us on 021 788 6068 or email events@casalabia.co.za
Cucina Labia will be open before the concert for dinner service between 17h30 and 19h50 – bookings are essential

Date: 28 January 2018

Time:  8 PM – 9:15 PM

Venue: Casa Labia Cultural Centre, 192 Main Road, Muizenberg, Cape Town

For more Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

From the City of Cape Town.

18 JANUARY 2018


In summary:

  • Day Zero is now likely
  • 60% of Capetonians won’t save water and we must now force them
  • Punitive tariff to force high users to reduce demand
  • 50 litres per person per day for the next 150 days
  • Drought Charge likely to be scrapped by Council

We have reached a point of no return. Despite our urging for months, 60% of Capetonians are callously using more than 87 litres per day. It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero. At this point we must assume that they will not change their behaviour and that the chance of reaching Day Zero on 21 April 2018 is now very likely.

The people who are still wasting water seem to believe that Day Zero just can’t happen or that the City’s seven augmentation projects – set to produce around 200 million litres per day – will be enough to save us. This is not the case and, while our water augmentation programme will make Cape Town more water resilient in the future, it was never going to be enough to stop Day Zero.

The crisis has reached a new severity, necessitating a series of new emergency measures:

A punitive tariff

We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them. We have listened to the comments of thousands of residents asking for fairness. Council will on Friday be voting on a punitive tariff that will charge residents exponentially higher rates for water usage above 6 000 litres per month.

The table below outlines the difference between the current and the proposed punitive tariffs:

Consumption per month Current Tariffs – total household water bill New Tariff – total household water bill
6 000 litres


R28.44 R145.98
10 500 litres R109.50 R390.82
20 000 litres


R361.06 R1 536.28
35 000 litres


R1 050.04 R6 939.57
50 000 litres


R2 888.81 R20 619.57

I will personally fight to ensure that the proposed punitive tariff exempts those who are using less than 6 000 litres per month.

Provision will be made for households larger than four people to ensure that they are not unfairly penalised. We ask residents to contact the City beforehand on water@capetown.gov.za or enquire at their nearest walk-in centre.

The proposed Drought Charge is likely to be dropped after a massive outcry from Capetonians that it was unfair. I understand that response and it has personally been a tough lesson for the City. I just want you to know that the City proposed the charge because we wanted to keep delivering important and essential services during this crisis. I wanted to continue making Cape Town a city that delivers opportunities for all. We are now going to have to make deep cuts to important projects.

50 litres per day for 150 days

We will be moving to level 6B restrictions with a new limit of 50 litres per person per day to make up for the many months of missing the 500 million litre per day collective consumption target. The new restrictions will come into effect on 1 February 2018.

The new daily collective consumption target is now 450 million litres per day. This will be in place for 150 days after which the City will reassess the situation.

Level 6B restrictions will also limit irrigation using boreholes and wellpoints.

Advanced Day Zero preparation

The City has also advanced its planning for Day Zero with approximately 200 sites having been assessed. The City will be announcing everyone’s local collection points from next week so that communities can begin preparing for that eventuality.

We will also be making detailed Day Zero contingency plans available soon to answer all questions that residents and businesses might have.

In terms of the City’s work, we have been working hard to reduce demand through advanced pressure management, massively ramping up the installation of water management devices at high consumption households.  Our teams are also significantly intensifying the leak detection and repair programme, and we are rolling out education and awareness campaigns and extending our use of the treated effluent system which offsets the use of the drinking water for non-potable purposes.

Teams are working around the clock to deliver the emergency plan for desalination, groundwater and water reuse. But, as I have already said, this alone will simply not be enough to avoid Day Zero without savings from all residents.

Cape Town, this is the moment where we can bring about the fundamental behaviour change that is needed to save us all from running out of water.

The time to act for everyone’s sake is now.

So if we reduce the demand enough now, we can still get our water delivered to our houses and not have to queue daily for our allocation.

For more information

This post was sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


The Masque Theatre presents Fame the Musical

The Masque Theatre presents Fame the Musical

The Masque Theatre is proud to present Fame the Musical as our end of year fundraiser.

Join the students of Performing Arts High School as they  experience hurdle after hurdle in their journey to becoming stars – learning that they can’t just sing and dance their way through life. With “Hard Work” , a bit of “Prayer”, “Think(ing) of Meryl Streep”, and a whole lot of “Dancin’ on the Sidewalk”, the students finally learn what it is to achieve “Fame”.

A cast packed full of talent, and expert direction – Fame is bound to be an absolute stunner of a production. Don’t delay, book today!

Date: 11 – 23 December 2017

Time: 19:30

Venue: Masque Theatre, 37 Main Road Muizenberg

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

MCSI Big Safety Day Out

MCSI Big Safety Day Out

MCSI’s BIG SAFETY DAY OUT promises to be fun for the whole family – so plan an afternoon at the beach and look out for all the action…

It’s the beach AND there’ll be loads of entertainment for kids and grown-ups!
What’s not to love?

MCSI’s BIG SAFETY DAY OUT promises to be fun for the whole family – so plan a day at the beach on
Saturday 16 December and look out for all the action…

Proudly hosted by MCSI with grateful assistance from Lisle (SAM9 EMS),
Grant (GM96 EMS) and Vaughn (NSRI Station 16) and partners…

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town Water Crisis: What you’ll have to pay in ‘water tax’

Cape Town Water Crisis: What you’ll have to pay in ‘water tax’

Source: The South African

Date: 2017-12-05

It is all but confirmed that from February next year, Cape Town will be introducing a “water tax” or a water levy or a water surcharge. Call it whatever you will.

The purpose of the charge is to raise more capital for long-term drought solutions. But it’s also a bit of a Catch22. Since the City is generating less income from water – with everybody saving so much – they are collecting less revenue. Thus meaning less money to pay for solutions.

But just how much will you have to pay?

Let’s take a look.



Cape Town’s proposed water levy charges

Residential property value (in ZAR) Water tax (ZAR)
400k none
600k 35
800k 45
1m 50
2m 115
3m 170
4m 225
5m 280
6m 340
7m 420
10m 565
20m 1120
50m 2800

But really, if your property is valued at R4 million, we’re pretty sure you can afford the R200 a month to pay your surcharge. Weren’t you spending that on filling your pool before restrictions anyway?

The City of Cape Town is searching for an additional R1bn per year while the dams recover from the unprecedented drought conditions.

Cape Town’s water use has spiked over the last few weeks. With rainy season well and truly over and the tourist season set to begin, it’s crunch time to avoid day zero.

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town has just been voted as the best city in the world… again!

Cape Town has just been voted as the best city in the world… again!

British tourists have voted Cape Town the best city in the world for the fifth consecutive year.

After a poll of 90,000 readers in the 2017 Telegraph Travel Awards, the South African city of Cape Town was victorious, beating Vancouver and Tokyo to the top prize. Remarkably, it’s the fifth consecutive year that Cape Town has been named number one – and with all eyes on South Africa in 2018, the centenary year of Nelson Mandela’s birth, few would bet against it repeating the trick in 12 months time.

Enver Duminy for Cape Town Tourism says the recognition will aid in creating more job opportunities for locals.

“These accolades pave the way for even more innovation, entrepreneurship and job creation within the tourism sector.”

“They also accurately reflect the variety of experiences Cape Town has to offer visitors, from unparalleled natural beauty, to delicious, intimate culinary adventures in our many restaurants.”

Sporty, stylish, stunning, sociable… if Cape Town was a person, it would be that Hollywood starlet we all secretly envy. A coming-together of cultures, cuisines and landscapes, there’s nowhere quite like Cape Town, a singularly beautiful city crowned by the magnificent Table Mountain National Park.

So, whether you’re after natural scenery, or interested in indulging in the diverse food scene Cape Town offers, you won’t be let down.

Apart from the weak rand, which is making travel to South Africa very appealing to foreigners, Cape Town is only very accessible in terms of accommodation.

Cape Town currently has the 21st biggest Airbnb market in the world, and guests can stay in high profile Cape Town suburbs for a fraction of typical area prices – whilst also immersing themselves within local culture.

A high percentage of locals are also using Airbnb for staycations within SA’s borders.

For hotel stays, SA hotel prices low in comparison to other African hubs. The average rate for a hotel room in Addis Ababa is about R3 212 per night, which is more than double what guests would pay in Cape Town – an average of R1 448 per night, according to a 2015 survey.

The rest of the upper end of the ranking has a familiar look. Vancouver has played second fiddle to Cape Town for the last five editions of the awards, while Venice, Sydney and New York are perennial members of the top 10.

Here’s the full top 10 list:

  1. Cape Town
  2. Vancouver
  3. Tokyo
  4. Venice
  5. Sydney
  6. New York
  7. Seville
  8. Florence
  9. San Francisco
  10. Rome

Sources: Telegraph Travel Awards, December 3, 2017

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South