Act For Change

Act For Change

Please get all details from Act For Change website

Join Africa’s Biggest Cleanup

When you throw something away – a piece of plastic, tin can, an old battery – where does it go? Do you realise there is no “away”?

And this devastating planet-wide problem of accumulating pollution is not going “away” either.

It’s time to come clean about the effects of our own everyday actions.

Join the Shoprite Group between 14-18 July by joining or hosting a cleanup in your area. Read more about this campaign.

For hosts

Choose a space / site close to your community that needs some love. Keep in mind:

  • Choose a safe area that has access to public transport or parking
  • An area with a recognisable landmark is helpful to ensure people find the starting point of the cleanup event on the day
  • Remember that if you want to cleanup private land, you need to get permission from the owner

We love local hosts

The host should be part of a local network, organisation or business:

  • We really want to engage communities and activate a big number of people to join ActForChange
  • This helps build trust, reaches a larger audience and provides support leading to a successful cleanup

The host will need to man the event on the day and drive awareness in his / her network

  • All hosts are required to count and report back the number of waste bags collected after reach event BECAUSE we need the information in order to substantiate the claim that we really hosted Africa’s biggest cleanup
  • Bags + gloves: All volunteers are requested to bring their own bags and gloves, however, should you wish to supply your volunteers with bags, kindly request a voucher that can be redeemed in any Shoprite or Checkers store in South Africa for a roll of Tuffy refuse bags by emailing cleanup@brownie-points.co.za (please note only a limited amount of vouchers are available for this purpose)
  • The ActForChange platform will send reminders to all registered volunteers for your event

    Please refer to website

    Curated content for Chas Everitt Cape Town South 

Crime Stats for Your Hood!

Crime Stats for Your Hood!

Crime Stats South Africa displays the latest and historic South African crime statistics in an easy-to-understand format. You don’t need to know anything about police precincts or provincial boundaries. You can search, by address, for your area on a map of South Africa and immediately access the information you need.

We have created this analytical application to be used as a guideline for the reported crimes in South Africa. This should in no way influence opinions on the purchase of a new home, the management of a business or other such matters. The SAPS release the latest crime statistics annually.

Crime Stats SA is the initiative of Meerkat Data Management our online data capture and reporting system. It means that any of our users are able to securely access the system and use it from any place on the planet where an Internet connection is available. No special software is required on any of your PCs – the system operates through any of the standard Internet web browsers.

The Heatmap displays all the precincts in South Africa to you. Each precinct is colour coded.

  • The number of total crimes for the category or categories you have chosen are sorted numerically and then divided into 5 blocks, called quintiles.
  • The first quintile contains the precincts in the bottom 20%, so they have the least crimes. They are shown in green.
  • The fifth quintile contains the precincts that have are in the top 20% in terms of number of crimes, in other words they have the most crimes. They are shown in red.
  • Therefore the colour of the precinct, from green to orange to red, indicates how many crimes it has in comparison to the others.
  • In the advanced Search you can drill down to the area and crime types.

Click here to view the worst ten precincts :  largest number of reported crimes in Western Cape

This content curated for Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town dams: Joy as water levels jump up by another 6%

Cape Town dams: Joy as water levels jump up by another 6%

What an unbelievable month for the Cape Town dams. Four weeks ago, the facilities were at less than 20% full. But now, they’re pushing the 40% mark.

More news on dam levels here

“The dams feeding the City of Cape Town are now better off at 37.8%.”

The Voëlvlei dam (currently 31.4% full this week), the Theewaterskloof dam (26.6% full this week) and the Bergriver Dam (61.7% full this week) are all showing improvements in excess of 5%.”

“With Bergriver dam having increased by nearly 10% in the past seven days. Up the West Coast the Clanwilliam dam has jumped from 20.4% a week ago to 36%. A few weeks ago the dam was below 6%.”

Numerous Amendments to Water By-laws

Numerous Amendments to Water By-laws

The City of Cape Town last month approved a number of amendments to the Water By-law. In addition to noting the amendments, the City encourages residents to familiarise themselves with what is required of them in terms of this legislation.

Read more below:

On 31 May 2018, Council voted to approve a number of proposed amendments to the Water By-law. These changes were aimed mainly at improving clarity, as well as preparing the City for a more water-scarce future.

Residents should please note that this amendment does not replace the Level 6 Water Restrictions. Rather, water restrictions are implemented in addition to this by-law, when necessary.

Changes most relevant to the general public include the following:

· Landlords must now keep record of consumption for each residential unit in a multi-tenant complex/block of flats, and inform the City if contraventions of water restrictions are taking place

· New developments must install water conservation and demand management systems, or alternative water systems, and these must be approved by the City before development proceeds

· The City’s oversight of plumbers has been strengthened by allowing the City to not only remove plumbers from its register but institute legal action if they are found to have transgressed the Water By-law

· Updates have been made to align the By-law with new legislation, standards and technical specifications.

· A prepayment meter is now an option, in addition to the WMD, as a Council water meter. While this technology is not yet at a stage of development for uptake by the City, having this item of legislation in the By-law allows the City to make use of it in the event that it becomes appropriate and necessary.

· Potable (drinking) water storage tanks must be impervious to sunlight to prevent the growth of bacteria

· No cross-connection must exist on private property between potable and non-potable water systems

· No irrigation of gardens is allowed between 09:00 and 18:00, including from boreholes and well-points. Previously no irrigation was allowed 10:00 and 16:00, and did not include borehole water. Watering gardens in the heat of the day can result in significant water lost to evaporation

· Maximum capacity for toilet cisterns and shower head flow has been lowered. Toilets are now only allowed a maximum 6 litre cistern volume (down from 9 litres), and water from shower heads must flow out at no more than 7 litres per minute (down from 9.5 litres/minute)

· All pools must be fitted with a cover to avoid evaporation when not in use

Read more

Property Valuations City Council

Property Valuations City Council

Every 3 years the City of Cape Town does a revaluation of all properties in accordance with market values to ensure that the property rates charges are assigned fairly and correctly.

How is your property valuation calculated?

Image from Cape Town City Council

Property valuations should reflect the market value of a property. The City uses a property’s value to calculate the monthly rates property owners should pay for their property.

The municipal valuer, as in the City’s valuer, is responsible for producing the General Valuation Roll (GVR) and is assisted by professional valuers, statistical analysts, data collectors, and support staff.

  • The valuations staff collect and review sales that take place around the date of valuation – the latest valuation forms part of the General Valuation (GV2015) Roll with property values as at 1 August in 2015.
  • The sales data is used in the Computer-assisted Mass Appraisal (CAMA).
  • CAMA is used by valuers to value properties in Cape Town.
  • To ensure fairness, the GV Roll is audited by an independent body – the GV2015 was audited by International Property Tax Institute.

In most cases, properties are only physically inspected when the property’s information on the valuations database is doubtful or where changes have taken place.

2018 General Valuation Roll (GV2018)

  • The City Valuation Office is currently preparing the GV2018 valuation roll.
  • The new value will be based on sales prices around July 2018
  • The GV2018 will be published in February 2019 for public inspection and objection.
  • Look out for your GV2018 valuation notice in February 2019.
  • More information will follow in January 2019 about the GV2018 and the public inspection and objection period.
  • Implementation of the new Municipal Valuation and your new rates account will be 1st July 2019.

eNeighbourhoods will keep you informed with communications on the 2018 Valuation with comment and advice from professional valuers including from Steer & Co.  To get this information all you need to do is subscribe to this blog or send a blank email to v2018@eneighbourhoods.co.za

* Only 2018 Valuation specific notices will be sent to you *

Information sourced for Cape Town City Council and professional valuers.

Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Has your household got a common understanding of what should actually happen when the alarm goes off?  This morning we had another false alarm, and yes most times they are!  Being a house where we have a few people at home most of the time, I considered this morning’s casual response as the alarm was switched off and how everyone just carried on about their business. Sooner or later we could pay a high price for that casual response of annoyance and irritation.

Do you have an agreed ALARM PROCEDURE that everyone in your household follows?  Well I decided we need one and I am sharing ours.  I have stuck it next to the alarm panel.

The alarm must automatically be treated as a SERIOUS MATTER and the following rules are to be followed:

1)  Do not go outside to investigate alone!

2) Lock all doors and close all windows immediately!  First close the doors and then close then windows INCLUDING the bathroom window and kitchen windows (ALL windows).

3)  If I am not at home you need to observe from inside of the house and consider some good vantage spots where you can look out.

4)  Do NOT turn off the alarm too soon and only turn off the alarm after doors and windows have been closed – the alarm will encourage an intruder to go not hand around but if you turn it off too soon it encourages them to stay!  Reset the alarm immediately.

5)  Only reopen doors and windows when it is obvious all is ok.  If I am not at home then observe for at least 30 minutes before opening up windows and doors.

6)  If anyone is observed then phone the emergency number 10111 and speak clearly telling them we have an intruder and the address – speak clearly and slowly.

7)  Move out of less secure rooms (like a sunroom) into more secure rooms!  It is generally considered best that the intruder sees people are at home and be seen speaking on the phone so he knows he has been seen and is being reported.  Even if you have finished speaking keep “talking” on the phone so he thinks you are giving information!  This will increase the chance of the intruder LEAVING.

8)  It is probably better to open gates from inside the house (if you have remotes) so the intruder can get away and help can get inside.

9) Make sure everyone knows where torches and other security devices are kept IN ONE ACCESSIBLE PLACE.

Keep emergency numbers somewhere they are not moved! On the fridge or next to the phone and include other numbers you can also call such as neighbours!

Personalise these notes for your property and family and share extra comments and advice.

Be prepared and stay safe.

This original article is shared with you by Andre de Villiers –  Chas Everitt Cape Town South