The Winter Garden in Cape Town

The Winter Garden in Cape Town

There’s always work to be done in the garden to keep green fingers busy – even in winter. Our June gardening guide is packed with tips, from keeping your garden healthy to which vegetables to grow in winter.

Spotlight on: Indoor projects for kids
Keep your children busy these winter holidays with fun indoor-garden projects:

  • We love this eggshell succulent garden, and so will your kids. They’re easy to make and an effective way to teach the basics of gardening.
  • Dress up ordinary flowerpots with these creative gumboot gardens. They are also the best way to upcycle your old boots!
  • Transform an ordinary herb pot into a work of art with just two creative tools: blackboard paint and chalk. Simply paint the rim or base of your terracotta pots (whichever style you prefer) with blackboard paint, then label with the herb name in chalk when it’s dry.

ON YOUR TO-DO LIST FOR JUNE  

Plant and sow

Feed

  • Feed lemon trees with a 2:3:2 general fertiliser.
  • Remedy yellowing leaves with a micro-element mixture such as Trelmix.
  • Feed bulbs with bulb food once every two weeks and water well.
  • Winter- and spring-flowering seedlings require an organic fertiliser such as Nitrosol or Atlantic All-purpose fertiliser every two weeks with a weekly watering.
  • Check the edges of sweet peas. If they’re brown and papery, feed with a 3:1:5 fertiliser.
  • Feed indoor plants with Nitrosol weekly.

   Prune & Trim

 Pests

  • Keep an eye out for leaf miner on cinerarias and spray with Bioneem.
  • Use Bioneem on conifers to ward off aphids, or dissolve insecticide granules in water to pour at the base of the tree.
  • Use organic snail bait for snails on cliviasdaffodils and young seedlings.

    Thanks to Stodels for this article

From Dear Cape Town

The City of Cape Town has opened their draft budget for public comment and is asking for your input on the proposed increases in rates, taxes, water, electricity and refuse removal.

[click to view the increases]

By calling for public comment, the CoCT has provided an excellent opportunity for you to directly influence the budget in the direction you want it to go.

We urge you to have your say by clicking the green button below and to encourage everyone you know to participate in this essential process. As an extra measure, DearSA will compile a report from all comments received and will present it to the City to ensure the voice of the public is not ignored.

Please take action and participate now as the closing date is Monday 29 April.

Thank you for participating in your democracy.

The team at 
Dear South Africa.

Should the green button not show, please use this link; https://www.dearcapetown.co.za/coct2019/

 

Editor’s Note: 

PROPERTY VALUATION and RATES

The 2019/20 Budget tabled on 28 March 2019 has changes to the way property rates will be calculated in future.
There is an increase from the point where property rates start to be payable. It was increased from R200 000 to R300 000. The Rate in Rand was lowered from 0.007154 to 0.00555. It represents a 22% drop in the Rate in Rand rate.
The nett effect of these changes is that properties that had a property valuation (GV2018) increase of 30% will be paying the same rates as before. Lower than 30% property valuation will see a decrease in property rates. Those with a property valuation increase (GV2018) of more than 30% will progressively see an increase in their property rates bill.

Curated content by eNeighbourhood for Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Local Real Estate MD Predicts Increases in Sales Activity after Elections

Local Real Estate MD Predicts Increases in Sales Activity after Elections

Sally Gracie, an experienced local agent and MD of Chas Everitt Cape Town South with offices in Fish Hoek, Tokai and Bergvliet says there are plenty of buyers waiting to take action after the election.

“It is not just an observation based on gut feel, it is the clear imbalance between those viewing properties on the portals and the offers being taken. As an agency that monitors many key indicators, we see an issue here showing considerable interest by buyers but a reluctance to follow through with offers. This usually indicates a confidence issue and it’s clear that at the moment we can attribute this to the imminent elections”, says Sally Gracie.

Sally Gracie, Managing Director of Devler Estates trading as Chas Everitt Cape Town South

“We measure four major indicators; the number of people viewing our listings online, the number of appointments that result from this interest and then the number of offers taken and sales concluded,” said Sally.  “When the number of people viewing property increases, but the number of offers taken decreases, then it is clear there is a confidence issue we need to identify. Based on our recent discussions with buyers it is clear that it is not Eskom but the election that is impacting on buyers taking action. “

Sally cautioned sellers to not misread the market. “This situation does not mean that we are expecting an increase in prices as we have had a build-up of stock, in particular at the top end of the market where supply has increased substantially since the start of the year. Sellers need to remain competitive! What is needed is turnover, and we expect that movement will pick up, absorbing the increase in stock that we are currently servicing. I think we can say this is good news for everyone,” she said.

Website: www.cei.co.za

For a free market evaluation email Sally Gracie

 

Noseweek article on baboons asks many questions

Noseweek article on baboons asks many questions

Klein Constantia and the two exhumed baboons

A primate murder mystery puts one of South Africa’s best-known wine estates on the spot. 

Klein Constantia on the slopes of the Constantiaberg in Cape Town, is one of South Africa’s most famously “green” wine estates. A WWF Conservation Champion, it touts its environmentalism widely. A 2015 book titled The Wine Kingdom – Celebrating Conservation in the Cape Winelands claims that it has “extensive soil erosion plans” and aims to build a cellar “that will be powered by solar energy”. It mentions that Klein Constantia “has also experienced serious damage to their crops caused by baboons, but today most of this problem is taken care of by using baboon monitors during harvest”.

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